»I don’t mistrust reality of which I hardly know anything. I just mistrust the picture of it that our senses deliver.«

Gerhard Richter

Blog BUILDING OF THE WEEK

Alvernia Studios

Off-world architecture near Krakow

  • Alvernia Studios is a futuristic playground for the film industry, hidden in the Polish countryside. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios) 1 / 8  Alvernia Studios is a futuristic playground for the film industry, hidden in the Polish countryside. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios)
  • Glass corridors reminiscent of an off-world atmosphere, connect a system of domed structures. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios) 2 / 8  Glass corridors reminiscent of an off-world atmosphere, connect a system of domed structures. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios)
  • Inspired by the art of H. R. Giger, decorative motifs that adorn the interiors float somewhere between science fiction and Art Nouveau. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios) 3 / 8  Inspired by the art of H. R. Giger, decorative motifs that adorn the interiors float somewhere between science fiction and Art Nouveau. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios)
  • Temperature and humidity controls maintain optimal conditions for a film-scoring studio, while a flower-like device manipulates acoustics. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios) 4 / 8  Temperature and humidity controls maintain optimal conditions for a film-scoring studio, while a flower-like device manipulates acoustics. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios)
  • The high-tech audio mixing studio reflects the futuristic vision of the building.  (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios) 5 / 8  The high-tech audio mixing studio reflects the futuristic vision of the building.  (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios)
  • Described by those in the industry as “a film within a film”. (Photo: Alexander Belenkiy) 6 / 8  Described by those in the industry as “a film within a film”. (Photo: Alexander Belenkiy)
  • Alvernia Studios is home to the largest spherical blue screen in the world, allowing for limitless special effects possibilities. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios) 7 / 8  Alvernia Studios is home to the largest spherical blue screen in the world, allowing for limitless special effects possibilities. (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios)
  • (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios) 8 / 8  (Photo courtesy Alvernia Studios)

Alvernia Studios is a bizarre, futuristic wonderland, home to the largest modern film studio in Poland. Set in the countryside 18 kilometres from Krakow airport, it was designed and built in 2002 by media entrepreneur Stanislaw Tyczyński, the founder of Poland’s first private radio station, RMF FM.  Inspired by the art of H. R. Giger, the distinctly alien-looking 13,000-square-metre facility is comprised of an interconnected web of metallic domes that house sound stages, film scoring studios, and high-tech facilities for visual effects.

Described by those in the industry as “a film within a film”, every inch of the facility reflects the spirit of a sci-fi movie set: thick tubes of glass corridors stretch between the shiny metal domes – while the interior, decorated from floor to ceiling with futuristic motifs, evokes the feeling of walking through a monumental spaceship.

Described by those in the industry as “a film within a film”. (Photo: Alexander Belenkiy)

Technical features at Alvernia Studios include door handles operated by fingerprint readers and a dome containing the world’s largest shade-less spherical blue screen. In the recording studio, a special device opens and closes like a flower, changing the acoustic parameters of the space. The main structure of reinforced concrete, polyurethane foam, and compressed PVC air balloons, is resistant to rain, frost, and wind and probably recycling as well, which means these space-colony style “domes from the future” may outlive us all.

- Susie S. Lee

  • Facebook
  • Tumblr
  • Twitter

Advertisement

RECENT POSTS

more

Recent Magazines

25 Apr 2016

Magazine No. 43
Athens

  • essay

    From the Bottom and the Top

    Powering Athens through collectivity and informal initiatives by Cristina Ampatzidou

  • photo essay

    Nowhere Now Here

    A photo essay by Yiorgis Yerolymbos

  • Essay

    Back to the Garden

    Athens and opportunities for new urban strategies by Aristide Antonas

  • Interview

    Point Supreme

    An interview by Ellie Stathaki

>

03 Mar 2016

Magazine No. 42
Walk the Line

  • Essay

    The Line Connects

    An essay on drawing and architectural education by Wes Jones

  • Essay

    Drawing Attention

    Phineas Harper sketches out new narrative paths with pencil power

  • Essay

    Gotham

    Elvia Wilk on a city of shadows as architectural fiction

  • Interview

    The (Not So) Fine Line

    A conversation thread between Sophie Lovell and architecture cartoonist Klaus

>

28 Jan 2016

Magazine No. 41
Zvi Hecker

  • essay

    Space Packers

    Zvi Hecker’s career-defining partnership with Eldar Sharon and Alfred Neumann by Rafi Segal

  • Interview

    Essentially I am a Medieval Architect

    An interview with Zvi Hecker by Vladimir Belogolovsky

  • viewpoint

    The Technion Affair

    Breaking and entering in the name of architectural integrity by Zvi Hecker

  • Photo Essay

    Revisiting Yesterday’s Future

    A photo essay by Gili Merin

>

17 Dec 2015

Magazine No. 40
Iceland

  • Viewpoint

    Wish You Were Here

    Arna Mathiesen asks: Refinancing Iceland with tourism – but at what cost?

  • Photo Essay

    Spaces Create Bodies, Bodies Create Space

    An essay by Ólafur Elíasson

  • Focus

    Icelandic Domestic

    Focus on post-independence houses by George Kafka

  • Essay

    The Harp That Sang

    The saga of Reykjavík's Concert Hall by Sophie Lovell & Fiona Shipwright

>

more

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MAILING LIST Close

Uncube is brandnew and wants to look good.
For best performance please update your browser.
Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer 10 (or higher), Safari, Chrome, Opera

×