»I hate vacations. If you can build buildings, why sit on the beach?«

Philip Johnson

Blog Agenda

Brazilian Quartet

  • “Lelé – Architect of Health and Happiness” at the NAI, features Brazilian modernist architect João Filgueiras Lima, known as Lelé. A symposium will take place at TU Delft on 31 January. 1 / 5  “Lelé – Architect of Health and Happiness” at the NAI, features Brazilian modernist architect João Filgueiras Lima, known as Lelé. A symposium will take place at TU Delft on 31 January.
  • The symposium features four Brazilian architects who will situate their work in the lineage of modernism in Brazil, including Marcos Acayaba. (Shown is his Residencia em Tijucopava. Photo: Nelson Kon) 2 / 5  The symposium features four Brazilian architects who will situate their work in the lineage of modernism in Brazil, including Marcos Acayaba. (Shown is his Residencia em Tijucopava. Photo: Nelson Kon)
  • Marcello Ferraz will also participate. Shown here is the SESC Pompéia, a project he completed in conjunction with a superstar of Brazilian modernism, Lina Bo Bardi. 3 / 5  Marcello Ferraz will also participate. Shown here is the SESC Pompéia, a project he completed in conjunction with a superstar of Brazilian modernism, Lina Bo Bardi.
  • The participants span a few generations of Brazilian architects, including Angelo Bucci, born 1962. Shown here is his and Alvaro Puntoni's Casa em Carapicuiba (Photo: Nelson Kon) 4 / 5  The participants span a few generations of Brazilian architects, including Angelo Bucci, born 1962. Shown here is his and Alvaro Puntoni's Casa em Carapicuiba (Photo: Nelson Kon)
  • The youngest architect in the symposium is Eduardo Ferroni, whose firm H+F will build the Golf Headquarters for the upcoming Olympics, shown here in a rendering.  5 / 5  The youngest architect in the symposium is Eduardo Ferroni, whose firm H+F will build the Golf Headquarters for the upcoming Olympics, shown here in a rendering. 

Brazil’s diverse examples of modernist architecture – and its contemporary legacy – present a rich pastiche of reactions to the possibilities of form and function, far outside of the European context. While this seems at once both unsurprising and an intriguing proposition, the fact of the matter is that the architectural landscape of Brazil is still rife with the possibility of discovery, even in our hyper-global blogospheric context of architectural exploration. The Netherlands Architecture Institute is mounting the exhibition “Lelé – Architect of Health and Happiness” featuring the visionary Brazilian architect João Filgueiras Lima, better known as Lelé. His practice was founded on the idea that architecture could create better lives and therefore advance society as a whole. Little known outside of Brazil until recent international exhibitions, the show at the NAI features the diversity of scales and applications of his ideals – and ideas – for architecture that encouraged a new social justice through form.

As a companion to the rather special show at the NAI, a seminar will take place on Thursday the 31st of January 2013 at the TU Delft. The seminar panel is composed of four Brazilian architects –also little known outside of Brazil – who practice in a way that compliments the legacy of Lelé and the larger field of modernist architectural practice in Brazil and South America. Spanning the generations from the post-war to the recent past, all of the participants are active in the architectural scene today. The architects are: Marcos Acayaba (1944); Marcello Ferraz (1955); Angelo Bucci (1962); and Eduardo Ferroni (1977). See our slideshow above for some of their signature work. Registration is required for the symposium. Email Tessa Wijtman-Berkman for information.

“Lelé – Architect of Health and Happiness”
Netherlands Architecture Institute
Museumpark 25, Rotterdam
23 October 2012 – 10 February 2013

 

The public seminar will take place on 31 January, 2013 from 13:45 – 17:30 with drinks until 19:00.
TU Delft
Berlagezaal, Faculty Architecture TU Delft
Julianalaan 134, Delft

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